The employment and financial effects on families raising children with special health care needs: an

Authors, Primary DeRigne,L.
Title Primary The employment and financial effects on families raising children with special health care needs: an examination of the evidence
Periodical Full Journal of Pediatric Health Care
Pub Year 2012
Volume 26
issue 4
Start Page 283-290
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Over 10 million children in the United States have special health care needs (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2008). Parents struggle to afford needed health care and wrestle with the dual responsibilities of caregiving and employment. Researchers from a variety of disciplines, health care, and social science, in particular, are analyzing what variables affect a family's ability to access needed health care while balancing work and caregiving. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted on the past 11 years of research that examined insurance status, insurance type, family out-of-pocket expenses, employment outcomes (reductions in hours or stopping work all together), and the role of receiving care in a medical home. RESULTS: It was found that private health insurance, more severe conditions, and specific diagnoses are related to increased expenses and employment changes. It was also found that receiving care in a medical home reduces both. DISCUSSION: It is vital that clinicians and policy makers move forward in expanding the concept of the medical home model as a means to improving the well-being of families raising children with special health care needs.
Publisher Not Available
Place of Publication United States
Author/Address Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA. lderigne@fau.edu
PubMed Link
Reference Type(s) Journal Article
Topic Tag(s) Comprehensive Care;Care Coordination;Outcomes
Special Population(s) Children with Special Needs
Case Study No
Commentary/Opinion Piece No
Historical Publication No
Key/Foundational Article No
Literature Review Yes
Article Rating No
Summary of Article Rating No